It’s a Cover Up I

Sarah provides a lot of good advice in this article. As someone who designs book covers for other people, I find myself in a bind at times because the client, the person paying my bills, isn’t necessarily interested in my input. They just want me to create the cover based on what they envision. When I suggest that putting five characters on the cover is going to make it too busy, and much too difficult to distinguish at a small size, they often tell me to go pound sand and then find someone who will make the cover without providing advice. But you as the writer looking for someone to make a cover for you can benefit from Sarah’s article and either make a decent cover yourself or commission a cover that doesn’t suck.

Mad Genius Club

Most indie authors have rolled, with relative ease, into hiring content editors and even copyeditors, (just don’t put either under “editor” on amazon. That editor tag on Amazon is for anthologies. You also shouldn’t put your cover artist under “illustrator.” Before I figured out that clueless authors were doing that, I passed up a bunch of books because I thought “An illustrated hard boiled mystery? Too weird for words.” That tag is there for actual illustrated books.)  or figuring our how to swap with other indies for these services (which amounts to hiring) or other more creative arrangements.

One stumbling block remains in most writers’ publication schedule: covers.

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Relationships and Anthologies

I am very pleased with the relationship I have with Chris Kennedy Publishing. Their contract is very clear and fair for participating in an anthology. I’m still thrilled that I had the opportunity to participate in one of their Four Horseman anthologies – “Luck is Not a Factor”.

Mad Genius Club

I got involved in a conversation over on a friend’s social media this week. He’d referenced a memory, and commented that it had been 8 years since he’d been published in these anthologies, and he’d never seen any money from it. No upfront payments, no royalties, nothing. Now, it’s not that Jason Cordova is a bad writer. Far from it. And the man grinds at his work, he’s not lazing around waiting for something to hit big. But it rankled him that there had been big promises, brutally constrictive contracts and in the end… nothing. The conversation wandered from discussing, in veiled non-specifics, the publishing company that had burned him, to talking about how to find anthologies that actually care about the writers involved.

I was asked to write about how to find non-predatory small presses, and I’m happy to give my small insight into this, but I also…

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